Press

Interview with the Hartford Advocate February 28, 2012:  http://www.ct.com/entertainment/music/shows/wtxx-advocate-interview-composer-arthur-hernandez-20120228,0,2396445.story

“Brilliantly exploiting the potential and idiosyncrasies of this beautiful instrument, Hernández creates an expansive and lyrical work evocative of the New England landscape that is his home.” – ABLAZE  Records

“Exciting…engaging…thought-provoking and virtuosic… are just a few words to describe Arthur Hernandez’s music. The adventurous sonorities and rhythmic twists and turns in works like his impressive String Quartet No. 1 and orchestral work Stellaluna make serious music once again a fulfilling experience.” – Jeffrey Krieger, Principal cellist, Hartford Symphony Orchestra

“His works are adventurous and daring.” – Robin Young, “Here and Now,” NPR/WBUR-FM, Boston

“Two movements from Arthur Hernandez’ unfinished String Quartet No. 1, on the other hand, seemed electrically charged. The sequential entrance led by the viola was mirrored many times by the lightning speed with which brief melodic snippets were tossed, like a hot potato, from instrument to instrument. The music was assured in lyric line, with tension heightening tremolo dramatically introduced at the climax.  The concluding movement was hyper tense and nervous, with agitated nasal tremolos, a sort of Bartokian chugging linearity, and a long cello solo virtually amounting to a solo cadenza.” – Herman Trotter, Music Critic, The Buffalo News

“His recent string quartet performed last year at The June in Buffalo Music Festival, was one of the strongest works presented in a group of over sixty new pieces, and it received international acclaim as well. His works display formal invention, a strong lyrical gift, and have behind them a tremendous force of energy. I expect big things from Arthur in the future.” – David Felder, Artistic Director, The June in Buffalo Music Festival

“Arthur Hernandez’s ‘Janus’ places amplified cello and electric guitar in a series of driven or otherworldly sonic spheres. The influence of rock can be heard in the frenzied unison riffs and guitar glissandos. There are moments of tenderness from the cello, while the guitar explores a vast terrain of effects and ventures into wild cadenza land. The piece is concise, exuberant, and almost defiantly weird.  Cellist Heidi Albert and guitarist Jason Vieaux brought enormous energy and haunting lyricism to the demands.” – Donald Rosenberg, Music Critic, The Cleveland Plain Dealer

“Arthur Hernandez’s Fantasy for Solo Saxophone was handsomely played by Donald Wilkinson.  Rich coloration and unusual harmonics made it the most intriguing piece on the program.” – Betty Ligon, Music Critic, The El Paso Herald Post

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